September 29, 2014

thatdamntrenchcoatangel:

joellamarano:

Well Tumblr it’s that time of the year again. It’s heart breaking I even have to remind people of this.

As we approach the Halloween season if you have a black cat [especially an indoor/outdoor one] it’s time to make sure they stay inside. Unfortunately around this time of the year people think it’s funny to harass and harm them. It makes me sick to my stomach but some people even go as far as to ‘sacrifice’ them. Most adoption groups won’t even adopt them out during this month. I’ve even heard of people trying to harass them when they see them sitting in windows of houses. It’s horrible and not funny but it’s important to protect them.

So if you or anyone you know has a black cat make sure they are aware of where the cat is. And if you see anyone hurting or harassing them [or any cat!] speak up, they can’t do it for themselves.

Reblogging because I’d cut a bitch if they hurt my baby boy, Ninja

(via piertotum-locomottor)

September 29, 2014
"The ease of not being aware of privilege is an aspect of privilege itself, what some call “the luxury of obliviousness” (or in philosophy, “epistemic privilege”). Awareness requires effort and commitment. Being able to command the attention of lower-status individuals without having to give it in return is a key aspect of privilege. African Americans for example, have to pay close attention to whites and white culture and get to know them well enough to avoid displeasing them, since whites control jobs, schools, government, the police, and most other resources and sources of power. White privilege gives little reason to pay attention to African Americans or how white privilege affects them.

In other words, as James Baldwin put it “To be white in America means not having to think about it.” We could say the same thing about maleness or any other basis for privilege. So strong is the sense of entitlement behind this luxury that males, whites, and others can feel put upon in the face of even the mildest invitation to pay attention to issues of privilege. “We shouldn’t have to look at this stuff,” they seem to say. “It isn’t fair.”"

— Allan G. Johnson, Privilege, Power, and Difference (via wretchedoftheearth)

(via feministsociology)

September 29, 2014
Not Sorry Feminism: Yes, It Is A Gender Issue

smitethepatriarchy:

Researchers create chat bots and give them either a traditionally female name or a traditionally male name. Results:

The study found that female bots received on average 100 malicious private messages a day while the male bots received an average of 3.7. It found that the user gender had a significant impact on the number of sexually explicit and threatening messages received. Moreover, studies suggest that women under-report cyber harassment due to feelings of shame, not over-report as the commentator suggests.

4:52pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZnGhEu1RzyFlg
  
Filed under: tw harassment 
September 29, 2014

(Source: clickthefrog, via smitethepatriarchy)

September 29, 2014

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

image

image

image

imageimage

image

image

image

Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

image

image

image

image

image

LOOKimage

image

image

image

ATimage

image

image

image

THESEimage

image

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

image

image

image

image

 image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

LOOK

(via mylittlecornerofsherlock)

September 29, 2014
"If white American feminist theory need not deal with the differences between us, and the resulting difference in our oppressions, then how do you deal with the fact that the women who clean your houses and tend your children while you attend conferences on feminist theory are, for the most part, poor women and women of Color? What is the theory behind racist feminism?"

— Audre Lorde (via bad-dominicana)

(via feministsociology)

September 28, 2014

(Source: amajor7, via raisingcain)

September 28, 2014

stannisbaratheon:

@WorstMuse is a relic of the human race

(via raisingcain)

September 28, 2014
tastefullyoffensive:

[sarahseeandersen]

tastefullyoffensive:

[sarahseeandersen]

(Source: sarahseeandersen, via raisingcain)

September 28, 2014

lesserjoke:

summer break more like

image

(via raisingcain)

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »